Alexander Goborov

The Biggest Crypto Crimes and Fiascos to Date: Our Top 10 List

Today’s top 10 list is comprised of the most notorious (and expensive) crypto crimes and fails known to date: Silk Road’s Ulbricht remains unbeaten
The Biggest Crypto Crimes and Fiascos to Date: Our Top 10 List

In the times of the ongoing crypto-economic crisis―to remind ourselves that we have seen far worse―we bring you our top 10 list of the most notorious crimes and failures of the crypto world to this day:

The Biggest Crypto Crimes and Fiascos to Date: Our Top 10 List

In tenth place is our good old friend Charlie Shrem who just keeps on going. Charlie already served time back in 2014 for making his Bitinstant crypto payment system available to drug dealers on the Dark Web.

Now, he is being sued by the Winklevoss Twins for not ever giving back their share of Bitcoins, equivalent to 32 million USD at the time of the lawsuit, which could be classified as a form of embezzlement. Whether Charlie is proven guilty or innocent remains to be seen.

In ninth place is the famous Thai actor Jiratpisit Jaravijit, known by his stage name Boom, which is all too appropriate for having caused a major media boom earlier this year when he was arrested for stealing 34 million USD worth of Bitcoin from a young Finnish investor.

After an initial introduction on the web, the Finnish man was taken to a casino in Macau and offered to invest in the hot new Dragon Coin. When he did just that, the scammers led by Jiratpisit Jaravijit disappeared without a trace, but fortunately, were eventually located and apprehended.

In eighth place is NiceHash, one of the largest crypto mining platforms in the world, based in Slovenia, a former constituent of the Socialist Republic of Yugoslavia. NiceHash came under a cyber attack in December 2017 as the Bitcoin bubble was in full force. Close to 5000 Bitcoins were stolen as a result of well-orchestrated security breach causing the website around 62 million USD.

Amazingly, while NiceHash’s reputation was indeed hurt, the platform is still operating today and considered by many to be one of the most reputable mining companies around.

In seventh place is the Zhou case from China. In the summer of this year, Chinese law enforcement officials arrested a group of IT specialists based in the Shaanxi province in Central China who used remote cyber-hijacking techniques to gain control of computers at several unnamed Internet companies.

The criminals, led by Zhou, managed to steal 87 million USD worth of digital currency, which is considered to be the biggest ever crypto theft, and all that, mind you, despite the Chinese government’s ongoing crypto ban.

In sixth place is the Italian company Bitgrail whose servers supposedly suffered a major security breach in February of this year. During the crypto siege, hackers stole 17 million Nano tokens, which at the time of the incident was equivalent to 195 million USD.

The news went from terrible to yet more scandalous when it was later reported that the founder, Francesco Firano, might have simulated the attack in order to cover unlawful withdrawals from the clients’ wallets from the previous year. The investigation is still going on with the investors suing the company and Bitgrail’s crypto wallets having been confiscated by the Italian police.

In fifth place is Parity Technologies based in Germany with offices in the UK. In perhaps the biggest epic fail of the crypto world known to date, Parity lost 300 million USD worth of Ether when one user accidentally became the owner of all of Parity’s multi-signature wallets last year.

Parity had been fixing their system in order to fight off repeated cyber threats from hackers; however, this backfired a millionfold by leaving a bug in their system that led to the peculiar situation of one client having gained ownership of other clients’ funds, which the client then proceeded to move around.

Whilst trying to set things right in a panic, the user, “devops199”, destroyed the transfer code, which unwittingly locked all of the funds in wallets with no possibility of access. Parity is said to be working on resolving the issue, currently to no visible result. Hard fork type solutions and alternate routes have been suggested, but Ethereum has not been very supportive in going along.

In fourth place is Coincheck, based in Japan, with the biggest reported cyber security breach known to date, also (quite alarmingly) from earlier this year. In January, during a well-executed attack, the hackers stole 523 million NEM coins from the exchange platform, which at the time of the accident were worth approximately 530 million USD, leading the company’s shocked president to call it “the biggest theft in the history of the world”.

The Japanese firm showed full compliance with the local law by opening its doors to inspections and promising to refund their clients. In April, Monex Group, which specializes in traditional finance, saw an opportunity in the wounded crypto giant and bought Coincheck. Impressively, the platform lives on with plans to enter the American market.

In third place is One Coin, a by now well-known crypto pyramid, the biggest Ponzi scheme case of the crypto world. The scam started back in 2015 in Bulgaria by Ruja Ignatova with her accomplices and spread to other regions, as is the case with any pyramid. The gist of it was this: learn how to crypto-trade with us and support our cryptocurrency, One Coin; invest in it and thus in the future, use the means we provide to mine it.

None of it went anywhere, of course, except that the brains behind the operation collected huge sums of money. While the full extent of the scam is yet to be determined, federal prosecutors in the US made arrests and charged the perpetrators with a 400 million dollar financial crime; the prosecutors in China arrested yet more scammers in their country and gave the figure of 267 million USD, taking the total damage to 667 million USD. So far.

In second place is India’s very own Bharatiya Janata Party, which in July of this year  was accused of money laundering using Bitcoin by no less than the Indian Congress itself. The accusation pertaining to the party’s questionable activities from the previous year was publicly presented by Shaktisinh Gohil, a spokesperson for the All India Congress Committee, who claimed that Bitcoin had been used to convert the party’s “black money into white”.

In a country riddled with corruption, an accusation of money laundering was nothing new; what was new though is that Bitcoin had been made the instrument. That, plus the amount of black money allegedly converted into Bitcoin, a whopping 760 million USD. India’s Supreme Court has since been called upon to launch a formal judicial inquiry, but the outcome remains uncertain.

And finally, in first place is Silk Road and its creator Ross Ulbricht, the mastermind behind the infamous platform responsible for popularizing Bitcoin―back then still a new phenomenon―for the purposes of decentralized trade on the Dark Web, mainly of illicit substances and firearms.

In 2013, Ulbricht was apprehended by the FBI and later charged with computer hacking, money laundering, and drug trafficking. His Bitcoins were seized and taken to the US Marshals Office, which held a public auction and sold them off to multiple buyers, among them Timothy Draper and Barry Silbert.

While Ulbricht is serving a double life sentence in Colorado’s Florence High Penitentiary, it must be painful for him to realize that his 144 000 Bitcoins would have been worth a staggering 2 billion USD at the time of his final appeal.

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Flash, Flash, a Hundred-Yard Dash: Darkcoin's Rapid Makeover Revisited

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From Darkcoin to Dash, here we briefly examine the history of quarterly prices and market cap values of one of today’s most desirable altcoins
Flash, Flash, a Hundred-Yard Dash: Darkcoin's Rapid Makeover Revisited

Dash, short for Digital Cash, is undoubtedly one of today’s most sought-after cryptocurrencies. Having been founded in January 2014 by Evan Duffield, it entered the Blockchain market as Darkcoin and was renamed Dash in March 2015.

Currently fighting with IOTA for the 12th position by market cap with around 1.4 billion USD, it is simultaneously occupying the 5th position by unit price with close to 165 USD per each one of its coins. That makes Dash a major player on the global market with much envy from its rivals directed at how the company managed to reach such heights in both these categories.

Below is the first graph (logarithmic) that shows a complete history of Darkcoin/Dash’s market cap values by quarter, since the coin’s inception up until now:

Dash 1

The very first quarter saw a modest start with only 5 million USD. However, the cap value increased fourteenfold and reached almost 70 million USD the following quarter—the highest cap value Darkcoin will ever see—in part thanks to the aftermath of the second Bitcoin bubble.

The next few quarters saw mainly satisfactory but not brilliant performance, both for Darkcoin as well as its new face, Dash, in the first nine months of its existence. The first six months of 2016 saw Dash starting to approach the days of Darkcoin’s former glory in the second quarter of 2014, with close to 60 million USD.

The second half of 2016 saw Dash’s market cap exceed its previous record and almost reach 100 million USD. The growth continued into the third Bitcoin bubble, having reached 1.5 billion USD in the first half of 2017, and finally peaked at over 12 billion USD, settling for its absolute maximum value in the second half of last year. The subsequent wane ensued in 2018, at that point already foreseen and expected, which left Dash where it is today, with the respectable average of 2.3 billion USD for this year’s last two quarters combined and 1.4 billion USD as of right now, during sordid times of the bear market.

Below is the second graph (logarithmic) that shows a complete history of Darkcoin/Dash’s prices by quarter, since the coin’s inception up until now:

Dash 2

The situation here is fairly identical. Darkcoin started at almost 1.5 USD per piece in its first quarter and also saw a gigantic increase in the second quarter with the price reaching almost 16 USD. There was a sharp dip after that, followed by a period of relative stability for the next year or so with the price tag being stuck mainly between 3 and 4 USD a pop for both Darkcoin and its post-makeover version, Dash.

Finally, the first half of 2016 saw a rapid increase, and the second half saw the price almost touch its previous record from the second quarter of 2014. The growth continued in 2017, just before and during the aforementioned Bitcoin bubble period, and reached its maximum of over 1 500 USD. The subsequent decline came, which saw Dash find its current position of 275 USD (double quarterly average) and 165 USD as of right now, in the bear market.

Having moved from 5 million USD (market cap) / 1.5 USD (unit price) at the very start to almost 1.4 billion USD (market cap) / 165 USD (unit price) right now, Dash has clearly come a long way and done very well for itself. The Darkcoin has truly made a hundred-yard Dash in a flash, crypto-economically speaking.

We hope you found this information handy. Stay tuned for more.

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The Biggest Crypto Crimes and Fiascos to Date: Our Top 10 List

Today’s top 10 list is comprised of the most notorious (and expensive) crypto crimes and fails known to date: Silk Road’s Ulbricht remains unbeaten
The Biggest Crypto Crimes and Fiascos to Date: Our Top 10 List

In the times of the ongoing crypto-economic crisis―to remind ourselves that we have seen far worse―we bring you our top 10 list of the most notorious crimes and failures of the crypto world to this day:

The Biggest Crypto Crimes and Fiascos to Date: Our Top 10 List

In tenth place is our good old friend Charlie Shrem who just keeps on going. Charlie already served time back in 2014 for making his Bitinstant crypto payment system available to drug dealers on the Dark Web.

Now, he is being sued by the Winklevoss Twins for not ever giving back their share of Bitcoins, equivalent to 32 million USD at the time of the lawsuit, which could be classified as a form of embezzlement. Whether Charlie is proven guilty or innocent remains to be seen.

In ninth place is the famous Thai actor Jiratpisit Jaravijit, known by his stage name Boom, which is all too appropriate for having caused a major media boom earlier this year when he was arrested for stealing 34 million USD worth of Bitcoin from a young Finnish investor.

After an initial introduction on the web, the Finnish man was taken to a casino in Macau and offered to invest in the hot new Dragon Coin. When he did just that, the scammers led by Jiratpisit Jaravijit disappeared without a trace, but fortunately, were eventually located and apprehended.

In eighth place is NiceHash, one of the largest crypto mining platforms in the world, based in Slovenia, a former constituent of the Socialist Republic of Yugoslavia. NiceHash came under a cyber attack in December 2017 as the Bitcoin bubble was in full force. Close to 5000 Bitcoins were stolen as a result of well-orchestrated security breach causing the website around 62 million USD.

Amazingly, while NiceHash’s reputation was indeed hurt, the platform is still operating today and considered by many to be one of the most reputable mining companies around.

In seventh place is the Zhou case from China. In the summer of this year, Chinese law enforcement officials arrested a group of IT specialists based in the Shaanxi province in Central China who used remote cyber-hijacking techniques to gain control of computers at several unnamed Internet companies.

The criminals, led by Zhou, managed to steal 87 million USD worth of digital currency, which is considered to be the biggest ever crypto theft, and all that, mind you, despite the Chinese government’s ongoing crypto ban.

In sixth place is the Italian company Bitgrail whose servers supposedly suffered a major security breach in February of this year. During the crypto siege, hackers stole 17 million Nano tokens, which at the time of the incident was equivalent to 195 million USD.

The news went from terrible to yet more scandalous when it was later reported that the founder, Francesco Firano, might have simulated the attack in order to cover unlawful withdrawals from the clients’ wallets from the previous year. The investigation is still going on with the investors suing the company and Bitgrail’s crypto wallets having been confiscated by the Italian police.

In fifth place is Parity Technologies based in Germany with offices in the UK. In perhaps the biggest epic fail of the crypto world known to date, Parity lost 300 million USD worth of Ether when one user accidentally became the owner of all of Parity’s multi-signature wallets last year.

Parity had been fixing their system in order to fight off repeated cyber threats from hackers; however, this backfired a millionfold by leaving a bug in their system that led to the peculiar situation of one client having gained ownership of other clients’ funds, which the client then proceeded to move around.

Whilst trying to set things right in a panic, the user, “devops199”, destroyed the transfer code, which unwittingly locked all of the funds in wallets with no possibility of access. Parity is said to be working on resolving the issue, currently to no visible result. Hard fork type solutions and alternate routes have been suggested, but Ethereum has not been very supportive in going along.

In fourth place is Coincheck, based in Japan, with the biggest reported cyber security breach known to date, also (quite alarmingly) from earlier this year. In January, during a well-executed attack, the hackers stole 523 million NEM coins from the exchange platform, which at the time of the accident were worth approximately 530 million USD, leading the company’s shocked president to call it “the biggest theft in the history of the world”.

The Japanese firm showed full compliance with the local law by opening its doors to inspections and promising to refund their clients. In April, Monex Group, which specializes in traditional finance, saw an opportunity in the wounded crypto giant and bought Coincheck. Impressively, the platform lives on with plans to enter the American market.

In third place is One Coin, a by now well-known crypto pyramid, the biggest Ponzi scheme case of the crypto world. The scam started back in 2015 in Bulgaria by Ruja Ignatova with her accomplices and spread to other regions, as is the case with any pyramid. The gist of it was this: learn how to crypto-trade with us and support our cryptocurrency, One Coin; invest in it and thus in the future, use the means we provide to mine it.

None of it went anywhere, of course, except that the brains behind the operation collected huge sums of money. While the full extent of the scam is yet to be determined, federal prosecutors in the US made arrests and charged the perpetrators with a 400 million dollar financial crime; the prosecutors in China arrested yet more scammers in their country and gave the figure of 267 million USD, taking the total damage to 667 million USD. So far.

In second place is India’s very own Bharatiya Janata Party, which in July of this year  was accused of money laundering using Bitcoin by no less than the Indian Congress itself. The accusation pertaining to the party’s questionable activities from the previous year was publicly presented by Shaktisinh Gohil, a spokesperson for the All India Congress Committee, who claimed that Bitcoin had been used to convert the party’s “black money into white”.

In a country riddled with corruption, an accusation of money laundering was nothing new; what was new though is that Bitcoin had been made the instrument. That, plus the amount of black money allegedly converted into Bitcoin, a whopping 760 million USD. India’s Supreme Court has since been called upon to launch a formal judicial inquiry, but the outcome remains uncertain.

And finally, in first place is Silk Road and its creator Ross Ulbricht, the mastermind behind the infamous platform responsible for popularizing Bitcoin―back then still a new phenomenon―for the purposes of decentralized trade on the Dark Web, mainly of illicit substances and firearms.

In 2013, Ulbricht was apprehended by the FBI and later charged with computer hacking, money laundering, and drug trafficking. His Bitcoins were seized and taken to the US Marshals Office, which held a public auction and sold them off to multiple buyers, among them Timothy Draper and Barry Silbert.

While Ulbricht is serving a double life sentence in Colorado’s Florence High Penitentiary, it must be painful for him to realize that his 144 000 Bitcoins would have been worth a staggering 2 billion USD at the time of his final appeal.

We hope you enjoyed our list. You may also like this one:

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October's Top 10 List of Token Holders on Ethereum: Electrify.Asia is Leading

Electrify.Asia has by far the most new ERC-20 token holders, which means it is currently the most popular cryptocurrency on the Ethereum network
October's Top 10 List of Token Holders on Ethereum: Electrify.Asia is Leading

Ethereum is one of the leaders of today’s crypto world: it is second only to Bitcoin by market cap with 20.5 billion US dollars; right now, it is also standing at number four in terms if its monetary value following Bitcoin, Maker, and Bitcoin cash with almost 200 USD for one coin of Ether.

But, of course, Ethereum is not only a giant platform that generates its own cryptocurrency: it also lets other cryptocurrencies use its Blockchain network, so long that all of the technical rules are observed within the ecosystem. As a result, all cryptocurrencies that are hosted by Ethereum, apart from its own Ether, must be ERC-20 compliant (Ethereum Request for Comment), and every holder of an Ethereum-based cryptocurrency is thus also a de facto holder of an ERC-20 token.

This means that ERC-20 token holder figures are indicative of how well a crypto coin is doing within the larger Ethereum framework. The more ERC-20 token holders there are, the better that “guest” currency is doing, and since Ethereum is also one of the market leaders, any given cryptocurrency’s internal popularity on Ethereum also directly reflects on how well it is paddling through the crypto sea in general.

Below is the top 10 list of this October’s new ERC-20 token holders for each of the leading Ethereum-based cryptocurrencies:

This October’s New Token Holders

The current winner by a landslide is Electrify.Asia with almost 100 000 new ERC-20 token holders this October, followed by XMax with around 13 500 new token holders, then Moneytoken with around 12 000, Skrumble Network with around 9 000, 0xcert with roughly 8 000, SALT with 7 000, UChain is lagging slightly behind with around 6 800, FansTime has close to 6 500 token holders, DAEX around 4 500, and finally Datum is in last place with just under 4 000 new ERC-20 token holders this October.

Being “the first retail electricity marketplace in Southeast-Asia addressing the need for transparency and security in the consumption of energy” and with their slogan promising to “build an intelligent energy ecosystem for Asia”, the Singapore-based Electrify.Asia, headed by Julius Tan and Martin Lim, have set very high expectations for themselves. Let’s see what happens closer to the New Year!

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The Top Crypto Dozen by Year of Formation

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If you ever wondered whether being the first meant staying ahead of rivals, this crypto list should offer some insight
The Top Crypto Dozen by Year of Formation

We have previously brought you a fair bit of statistics, from popularity trends to age categories of Bitcoin owners. But now, why not take a step back and look at the bigger picture, as it were. ICOs come and go, prices drop and skyrocket, but who is actually leading the market? Or, more interestingly, how long have they been doing so?

Below is our latest list that offers a brief crypto history from the start of the Blockchain movement up until now:

The Top Crypto Dozen

2008: The actual, seemingly invisible starting point, the global financial crisis. Huge banking corporations, among them Lehman Brothers and Goldman Sachs, go bankrupt. To many, this is the glaring signal that the centralized system is failing.

2009: The crypto pioneer Bitcoin gets launched by the mystery man Satoshi Nakamoto and later adopted as the currency of choice by the infamous Silk Road. Today, with the market cap of around 111.7 billion US dollars, it is the current leader, as well as the most valued altcoin on the market (around 6 500 USD a pop).

2011: Litecoin gets launched by Charlie Lee, a former Google employee. Though the second to be featured on our list (and of very similar fintech specifications to Bitcoin), it is, actually, currently occupying the seventh position by market cap with around 3.2 billion USD.

2012: Ripple, or XRP as it is known to many, gets launched. Despite the low price of around 50 US cents per coin, Ripple is both the third one to be mentioned in our list and concurrently the third one by market cap with roughly 21 billion USD. Note that XRP cannot be mined.

2014: Dash (first called XCoin, then Darkcoin, finally getting its present name in 2015), Monero, Stellar, and Tether get launched, who are currently occupying positions twelve with 1.4 billion USD, nine with 1.85 billion USD, six with 4.8 billion USD, and ten with 1.8 billion USD respectively. The fact that four of the leading companies appear in the aftermath of the 2013 Bitcoin bubble (that continued well into 2014) is surely no coincidence.

2015: Ethereum gets launched by the Russian-Canadian programmer Vitalik Buterin. In spite of formally entering the market comparatively late in the game, six years after Bitcoin, the Ethereum platform with its native coin, Ether, is in second place by market cap today with around 22 billion USD, slightly ahead of Ripple (with just around 800 million USD in excess). Ethereum futures are said to be on the way shortly.

2017: Bitcoin Cash (through the hard fork split with Bitcoin), Cardano, and TRON get launched, who are presently occupying positions four with over 10 billion USD, eight with roughly 2 billion USD, and eleven with 1.6 billion USD respectively. Once again, the fact that we have yet another three major players that emerged out of yet another crypto bubble (with Bitcoin’s price approaching 20 000 USD in December) does not look like a coincidence either.

2018: EOS gets launched. Being the latest newcomer, it is already at the very respectable number five by market cap with just over 5 billion USD. However, very recently, EOS got accused by the Ethereum-funded research companies, ConsenSys and Whiteblock, of not being a Blockchain company and instead being a cloud-like service. This could potentially affect EOS’s global standing, but the full outcome of this scandal still remains to be seen.  

We hope you found our list helpful. Stay tuned for more.

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Today’s Biggest Crypto Winners by Name

Nakamoto tops the crypto list with $6 billion
Today’s Biggest Crypto Winners by Name

Last week, we looked at The Biggest Crypto Owners in the World by Nation. It turns out that while Turkey’s 18% of the population reportedly own cryptocurrency, it is the United States with its 8% of the population that actually has the largest number of cryptocurrency owners, around 26 million people. That, coupled together with another fact about the US having the most computational power, miners, and Bitcoin nodes, puts the United States far ahead of its crypto rivals.

Today, we bring you the Biggest Crypto Winners by Name, a fresh list that has been put together with an aggregation technique of analyzing data from various online sources. Unsurprisingly, this list is also dominated by the Americans. Almost entirely. But not quite…

 the Biggest Crypto Winners by Name

In 7th place is Charlie Shrem (USA), an interesting character to say the least, one of the biggest Bitcoin pioneers who was at one point under criminal investigation for money laundering with a subsequent two-year prison sentence. Clearly, that did not curb the man’s crypto enthusiasm, and he is now back with a hefty $450 million, according to many sources.

In 6th place is the founder of Digital Currency Group and owner of Genesis, Barry Silbert (USA), with an estimated net worth of over $500 million. In 2014, he bought 48 000 Bitcoins in an auction held by US Marshals due to the shutting down of Silk Road; as a result, he has since been able to reap tremendous financial benefits from Bitcoin’s climb to the top.

In 5th place are the famous Winklevoss Twins (USA) with their supposed combined wealth of $600 million. While Cameron and Tyler were unsuccessful in gaining control of Facebook in the well-publicized legal battle against Mark Zuckerberg, as they were unsuccessful in creating a Bitcoin Exchange Traded Fund (ETF), they did invest religiously in Bitcoin back in 2013. Since then, the crypto exchange rate has skyrocketed and grown more than 20 times the original price making their initial investment very peachy indeed. Well, when you are twins, doubling your money may be somewhat easier.

In 4th place is Michael Novogratz (USA), a hedge fund manager and trader who began investing in cryptocurrencies back in 2013 and four years later created a $500 million crypto fund with over a quarter of that sum coming from his own pocket. Having involved himself with most major cryptocurrencies, most notably Bitcoin and Ethereum, Novogratz continued to buy and sell the various crypto units, quickly becoming a major crypto player on the market. His net worth is now estimated to be over $900 million.

In 3rd place is Tim Draper (USA), a venture capitalist and the founder of the investment firm Draper Fisher Jurvetson. Initially making his fortune through viral marketing and associated investments in such big brands as Skype, Hotmail, and Yahoo, the native Californian purchased 30 000 Bitcoins in the 2014 public auction (the very same one that gave way to Barry Silbert’s vigorous accumulation of wealth). All these well-executed efforts combined have put Draper’s wealth at over $1 billion!

In 2nd place*, we have both Ross Ulbricht (USA) and America’s very own Federal Bureau of Investigation. It must be noted that this place is entirely hypothetical: Ross Ulbricht’s funds have been confiscated. He is currently serving a double-life sentence for being the mastermind behind Silk Road and popularizing Bitcoin usage on his platform for the purposes of decentralized trade. This may sound innocent enough, but the punchline is that his infamous creation, Silk Road, traded and exchanged mainly illegal products, such as illicit substances and firearms, all in the depths of the infamous Dark Web.

In 2013, Ulbricht was arrested and 9 months later charged with money laundering, computer hacking, and drug trafficking. The FBI seized Ulbricht’s Bitcoins and passed them onto the US Marshals, who held an auction and sold them all off to those willing to pay, among them Silbert and Draper (who clearly did the wise thing by buying into them). Ulbricht’s Bitcoins which ended up in the FBI’s hands along with his other funds would have been now worth approximately $2 billion, which, in theory, puts both Ulbricht and simultaneously (though fleetingly) the FBI at our very respectable number 2.

In 1st place is the crypto household name Satoshi Nakamoto. As a matter of fact, no one knows, or at least no one admits to know, who Nakamoto really is. All that’s known is that this name is a pseudonym used by some man or woman, or possibly even a group of people, who created a pioneering mathematical code which resulted in the first ever cryptocurrency unit. The only other fact that’s known is that Nakamoto owns around 1 million Bitcoins, which roughly translates to the staggering $6 billion or more! That’s one filthy rich Japanese mystery at our number 1.

 the Biggest Crypto Winners

Interestingly, if Nakamoto were to actually sell off his Bitcoins, this would cause panic in the crypto market and consequently drive the price of Bitcoin down, which would leave Nakamoto with a lot less than Nakamoto has in assets right now. Talking about being left holding the crypto bag!

We hope you enjoyed our list. Stay tuned for more.

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