🤷 Opinions Alexander Goborov

Blockchain's Most Successful Women: The Lucky Seven List

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Today we bring you the names of Blockchain’s top females who have become major contributors to the global crypto movement
Blockchain's Most Successful Women: The Lucky Seven List
Contents

Today’s world of centralized finance and politics is often associated with a patriarchal structure, which is, it is said, dominated by cunning ambitious men, both old and young. Since Blockchain is the decentralized, mirrored version of this system supposedly striving for equality of opportunity, we thought it would be fun to look at some of the most successful women working in Blockchain today. Here’s our list of the seven ladies who were lucky, talented, and persevering enough to have made it big, listed alphabetically:

Athey, Susan (Ripple)

Athey

With a BA in economics, mathematics, and computer science from Duke University and a PhD in economics from Stanford, Susan Athey is probably the most rigorously trained and academically acclaimed of all of the females on this list. Having previously taught at MIT and Stanford, she worked as an economic consultant for Microsoft for a few years before joining Ripple in 2013. She has been serving on Ripple’s board of directors ever since contributing to the company’s economic strategy and educating the public on the use of the Blockchain technology and DLT.  

Baldet, Amber (Clovyr)

Baldet

A former executive director of JP Morgan’s Blockchain Center of Excellence, which “leads efforts for applications of distributed ledger technology (DLT) within JP Morgan”, Amber Baldet is now the cofounder and current CEO of the recently established platform Clovyr. According to Amber, the company specializes in developing a “framework and ecosystem of applications and services” on the Blockchain. An avid believer in this technology, she is considered to be an influential figure in the community, concurrently also serving on the board of the Zcash Foundation.

Boring, Perianne (Digital Chamber of Commerce)

Boring

Perianne Boring is the president and founder of Digital Chamber of Commerce, which was established back in 2014. The center claims to be no less than “the world's largest trade association representing the blockchain technology”, thereby putting Perianne at the very forefront of the industry. A graduate of the University of Florida, she was a legislative analyst in the US House of Representatives, as well as a financial services journalist for RT America before eventually establishing her own firm and claiming yet more limelight. Today, she is considered to be a major voice in the field, not only among women but also men.

Haun, Kathryn (Coinbase)

Haun

Kathryn Haun is serving on the board of directors of Coinbase, a well-known digital currency exchange platform based in San Francisco. Prized for her legal experience and expertise, the Stanford graduate previously worked as a federal prosecutor with the US Department of Justice. While there, she was involved in such high profile cases as fraud with extortion among federal agents in the Silk Road investigation, as well Bank Secrecy Act violations in the US Department of the Treasury vs. Ripple Labs. Now, Kathryn is using her impressive background to ensure that Coindesk operates well within the US government’s regulations and compliance guidelines.

Kim, Joyce (Stellar)

Kim

Joyce Kim is arguably one of the most accomplished crypto women today. Being the co-founder of Stellar (together with Jed McCaleb), the world’s sixth biggest crypto coin by market cap, Joyce resigned as the company’s executive director two years ago, though she still maintains close ties with the company. Having previously given speeches at the UN about migration and sustainable development, she embarked on a mission to tackle income inequality in some of the less privileged places across the globe, including Asia and Africa. In an effort to further this cause and attempt to solve real world issues through innovation, last year Joyce became a managing partner at SparkChain Capital, an early stage venture capital fund.

Reckhow, Carolyn (Casa)

Reckhow

Carolyn Reckhow is the head of operations and client services at Casa, a recently established company that specializes in multisig storage of digital currencies. She is also the former director of operations at Lubin’s ConsenSys, a company that develops software for Ethereum’s decentralized network, the very same one that earlier this month famously accused EOS of not being a Blockchain company. Carolyn comes from a social sciences background and refers to herself as a “macro social worker for the Internet”. With Casa’s ambitions growing by the day, Carolyn is sure to follow with her hands-on approach and finely honed communication skills.

Vranova, Alena (Trezor)

Vranova

After working for ten years in the insurance sector in her native Czech Republic, Alena Vranova later served as the CEO of Satoshi Labs and became famous in the crypto community for being the founder of the much sought-after Trezor wallet. Earlier this fall, she became the global director of development at Casa, the same recently established company that Carolyn Reckhow is now also working for. At present, Alena is using her strategic know-how and close ties with Satoshi Labs to build a client base comprised of the wealthiest crypto owners around, promising them the best possible hardware protection for their digital assets.   

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Alexander Goborov

The Biggest Crypto Crimes and Fiascos to Date: Our Top 10 List

Today’s top 10 list is comprised of the most notorious (and expensive) crypto crimes and fails known to date: Silk Road’s Ulbricht remains unbeaten
The Biggest Crypto Crimes and Fiascos to Date: Our Top 10 List

In the times of the ongoing crypto-economic crisis―to remind ourselves that we have seen far worse―we bring you our top 10 list of the most notorious crimes and failures of the crypto world to this day:

The Biggest Crypto Crimes and Fiascos to Date: Our Top 10 List

In tenth place is our good old friend Charlie Shrem who just keeps on going. Charlie already served time back in 2014 for making his Bitinstant crypto payment system available to drug dealers on the Dark Web.

Now, he is being sued by the Winklevoss Twins for not ever giving back their share of Bitcoins, equivalent to 32 million USD at the time of the lawsuit, which could be classified as a form of embezzlement. Whether Charlie is proven guilty or innocent remains to be seen.

In ninth place is the famous Thai actor Jiratpisit Jaravijit, known by his stage name Boom, which is all too appropriate for having caused a major media boom earlier this year when he was arrested for stealing 34 million USD worth of Bitcoin from a young Finnish investor.

After an initial introduction on the web, the Finnish man was taken to a casino in Macau and offered to invest in the hot new Dragon Coin. When he did just that, the scammers led by Jiratpisit Jaravijit disappeared without a trace, but fortunately, were eventually located and apprehended.

In eighth place is NiceHash, one of the largest crypto mining platforms in the world, based in Slovenia, a former constituent of the Socialist Republic of Yugoslavia. NiceHash came under a cyber attack in December 2017 as the Bitcoin bubble was in full force. Close to 5000 Bitcoins were stolen as a result of well-orchestrated security breach causing the website around 62 million USD.

Amazingly, while NiceHash’s reputation was indeed hurt, the platform is still operating today and considered by many to be one of the most reputable mining companies around.

In seventh place is the Zhou case from China. In the summer of this year, Chinese law enforcement officials arrested a group of IT specialists based in the Shaanxi province in Central China who used remote cyber-hijacking techniques to gain control of computers at several unnamed Internet companies.

The criminals, led by Zhou, managed to steal 87 million USD worth of digital currency, which is considered to be the biggest ever crypto theft, and all that, mind you, despite the Chinese government’s ongoing crypto ban.

In sixth place is the Italian company Bitgrail whose servers supposedly suffered a major security breach in February of this year. During the crypto siege, hackers stole 17 million Nano tokens, which at the time of the incident was equivalent to 195 million USD.

The news went from terrible to yet more scandalous when it was later reported that the founder, Francesco Firano, might have simulated the attack in order to cover unlawful withdrawals from the clients’ wallets from the previous year. The investigation is still going on with the investors suing the company and Bitgrail’s crypto wallets having been confiscated by the Italian police.

In fifth place is Parity Technologies based in Germany with offices in the UK. In perhaps the biggest epic fail of the crypto world known to date, Parity lost 300 million USD worth of Ether when one user accidentally became the owner of all of Parity’s multi-signature wallets last year.

Parity had been fixing their system in order to fight off repeated cyber threats from hackers; however, this backfired a millionfold by leaving a bug in their system that led to the peculiar situation of one client having gained ownership of other clients’ funds, which the client then proceeded to move around.

Whilst trying to set things right in a panic, the user, “devops199”, destroyed the transfer code, which unwittingly locked all of the funds in wallets with no possibility of access. Parity is said to be working on resolving the issue, currently to no visible result. Hard fork type solutions and alternate routes have been suggested, but Ethereum has not been very supportive in going along.

In fourth place is Coincheck, based in Japan, with the biggest reported cyber security breach known to date, also (quite alarmingly) from earlier this year. In January, during a well-executed attack, the hackers stole 523 million NEM coins from the exchange platform, which at the time of the accident were worth approximately 530 million USD, leading the company’s shocked president to call it “the biggest theft in the history of the world”.

The Japanese firm showed full compliance with the local law by opening its doors to inspections and promising to refund their clients. In April, Monex Group, which specializes in traditional finance, saw an opportunity in the wounded crypto giant and bought Coincheck. Impressively, the platform lives on with plans to enter the American market.

In third place is One Coin, a by now well-known crypto pyramid, the biggest Ponzi scheme case of the crypto world. The scam started back in 2015 in Bulgaria by Ruja Ignatova with her accomplices and spread to other regions, as is the case with any pyramid. The gist of it was this: learn how to crypto-trade with us and support our cryptocurrency, One Coin; invest in it and thus in the future, use the means we provide to mine it.

None of it went anywhere, of course, except that the brains behind the operation collected huge sums of money. While the full extent of the scam is yet to be determined, federal prosecutors in the US made arrests and charged the perpetrators with a 400 million dollar financial crime; the prosecutors in China arrested yet more scammers in their country and gave the figure of 267 million USD, taking the total damage to 667 million USD. So far.

In second place is India’s very own Bharatiya Janata Party, which in July of this year  was accused of money laundering using Bitcoin by no less than the Indian Congress itself. The accusation pertaining to the party’s questionable activities from the previous year was publicly presented by Shaktisinh Gohil, a spokesperson for the All India Congress Committee, who claimed that Bitcoin had been used to convert the party’s “black money into white”.

In a country riddled with corruption, an accusation of money laundering was nothing new; what was new though is that Bitcoin had been made the instrument. That, plus the amount of black money allegedly converted into Bitcoin, a whopping 760 million USD. India’s Supreme Court has since been called upon to launch a formal judicial inquiry, but the outcome remains uncertain.

And finally, in first place is Silk Road and its creator Ross Ulbricht, the mastermind behind the infamous platform responsible for popularizing Bitcoin―back then still a new phenomenon―for the purposes of decentralized trade on the Dark Web, mainly of illicit substances and firearms.

In 2013, Ulbricht was apprehended by the FBI and later charged with computer hacking, money laundering, and drug trafficking. His Bitcoins were seized and taken to the US Marshals Office, which held a public auction and sold them off to multiple buyers, among them Timothy Draper and Barry Silbert.

While Ulbricht is serving a double life sentence in Colorado’s Florence High Penitentiary, it must be painful for him to realize that his 144 000 Bitcoins would have been worth a staggering 2 billion USD at the time of his final appeal.

We hope you enjoyed our list. You may also like this one:

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The Market's Down, but No Need to Panic: Consider Both Sides of the Crypto Coin

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Many claim we’re in a pretty pickle, but there’s no reason to scream Mayday yet: the big picture remains reassuring
The Market's Down, but No Need to Panic: Consider Both Sides of the Crypto Coin
Contents

Some of the present market’s indices appear rather alarming: the bear does tend to roar and stomp. But exceedingly more alarmingly, some experts view it as the green light to peddle pessimism and panic to all around. While, for aught we know, this is but a phase, and must be taken as such. Traders should probably be less reckless, newcomers more vigilant, but the market isn’t going anywhere: it shall recover soon enough. Don’t sweat it.

Signs of the Supposed Crypto Armageddon

Bitcoin is down to around 5 500 USD, the lowest figure in over a year. To make matters worse, Bitcoin’s market cap figure has dropped below 100 billion USD, also for the first time in over 12 months. The past 24 hours have seen a decrease in total crypto market capitalization numbers by more than 30 billion USD.

Tether, being a stablecoin pegged to USD, saw a drop in its price on Kraken, where it trades for fiat. In addition to other factors, because of this compromised parity, crypto exchanges that trade against Tether, e.g. the Hong-Kong based Bitfinex, have seen the price of Bitcoin move down against the USD in return.

The fork-riddled Bitcoin Cash, which is about to be split into two separate altcoins (core/ABC and Satoshi’s Vision), Ethereum, and Ripple are all seeing declines of up to 12% a day in their values on the market. As a by-product of this freneticism, Ripple (18.7 billion USD) is now in second place by market cap after Bitcoin having recently surpassed Ethereum (18.35 billion USD).

The Bright(er) Side of the Coin

It’s important to understand that any industry, any financial sector, any economy will go through a period of stagnation and recession. There have been numerous examples of it from the Revolutionary War to the Great Depression. Heck, the Blockchain technology itself emerged in the aftermath of the 2008 global crisis. Lows give way to highs and improve the nature of the market in the process. It’s inevitable.

At the same time, even in today’s dire crypto-economic conditions, many vital indicators tell a positive story nonetheless. While there may be problems with diminishing cryptocurrency market cap values and falling prices on exchanges, the big picture is not solely a grey one. The Blockchain market itself is growing regardless, and it is projected to continue doing so in the future.

The Blockchain market

One of the very reliable sub-indicators of the fact that it is happening is the number of crypto wallets, which is growing by the day. Too promising a figure for those trapped in quicksand, surely.

 the number of crypto wallets

Furthermore, the ICOs are not vanishing, quite on the contrary. In spite of the Chinese government’s ban on this type of fundraising, the global figures are going up, which has been corroborated by numerous independent publications.

the ICO

Concurrently, some of the economic trends, however fragmental, are still bullish; Bitcoin, for one, until very recently, has been demonstrating a great deal of stability, and where longitudinal volatility is low, the whining voices should perhaps be tactfully sidelined.

All in all, despite the pressure and the stress, there is little time for poor-me-ness right now, when the overall crypto aura is that of vigor and, as mundane as it sounds, hope: after all, right this very second, whole crypto communities are working on new and yet newer ways to crypto-revolutionize the world and change the very nature of modern economy, from payment methods to employment.

Afterthought

“Abandon your posts! Flee, flee for your lives!”

image

A memorable line borrowed from Denethor, the infamous character from The Lord of the Rings trilogy. And we all know how that strategy worked out for him. Not too well really...

Instead, perhaps we should follow Gandalf’s orders and prepare for battle, the crypto battle that never ceases, be the market bear or bull. And yes, right now we are indeed in a bear market. The prices are plummeting, the grip is becoming weak: this is the very definition of it.

In actuality, all this means nothing more than the fact that the bull market has got to be on the way, its eager horns already glaring through thick mist somewhere in the distance. It’s coming. Despite the rocky road ahead, sooner or later, it is. In the meantime, keep your head above water and do not overdramatize. Be Zen. It’s going to be fine.

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EOS vs. Ethereum: The Bitter Rivalry Re-Examined

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EOS and Ethereum are continuously at loggerheads: here we attempt to deduce why
EOS vs. Ethereum: The Bitter Rivalry Re-Examined
Contents

Ethereum and EOS just don’t seem to be on the same page and agree on most things crypto, apart from unanimously declaring that the Blockchain itself is our virtual future. Of late, there have been scandals and accusations, but where is this all coming from? Is there more that meets the eye? Turns out yes, there is.

A Bit of History

Ethereum was established in 2015 by the Russian-Canadian programmer Vitalik Buterin. The company very quickly ended up among the market leaders, becoming the second most valuable currency by market cap with around 22 billion USD. EOS got officially launched much more recently, only this year, but the company is already the fifth in the world by market cap with around 5 billion USD.

Importantly, one of EOS’s founders, Daniel Larimer (the other being Brendan Blumer of Block.one), already possessed a substantial amount of crypto experience as he had previously founded both the Steem Blockchain, along with its native coin of the same name, and Steemit, the corresponding social networking platform, back in 2016.

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ERC-20 Tokens

What some may not remember is that EOS actually started out as an Ethereum Blockchain-based ERC-20 token company. Similarly to how, say, Electrify.Asia are conducting their business at present, EOS used Ethereum—having gathered around one billion USD from token sales—to gain the necessary momentum before they launched their very own EOS Blockchain.

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This means two things. One is that Ethereum was used as a crypto springboard of a sort whose services were let go of when they became redundant. And two, Larimer and Blumer were savvy or even devious enough to use not the Steem Blockchain, ready at hand, but the more powerful one by Ethereum, though it belonged to a different camp. Today, EOS has both its own Blockchain platform / EOS altcoin and its own working EOSIO token with a similar purpose to ERC-20. So yes, it is possible that Ethereum views EOS as a younger neighbor from across the street who has now suddenly started playing on the same team with the big kids… and winning, too.

The Punches Being Thrown

While both networks are solid, both have their drawbacks of course. The EOS team has been fairly vocal in pointing out or at least hinting at Ethereum’s technological problems and problems-to-be. For instance, traffic congestion for Ethereum is not that unusual with some reports of longer confirmation times having been publicly voiced already. Another one of Ethereum’s problems, which is, in fact, the cause of the first one, is scalability: because of how the platform is modelled, expanding it is bound to create all sorts of jams and delays, and, crucially, not let the network grow properly beyond a certain point. This dilemma is said to be noticeably less pronounced on the EOS Blockchain because of how the latter one is built.

Also, unlike Ethereum that charges its participants fees in the form of “gas”, EOS charges its users nothing whatever. Instead, the network asks for some power and bandwidth in exchange, which are proportional to the resources required to undertake that particular action on the platform. This was also publicly noted by those who side with EOS.

It didn’t take much time for the Ethereum team to return the favor which culminated in a serious accusation this past summer from Ethereum’s DApp developers, among them Justo. Conveniently enough, this accusation also single-handedly explained why Ethereum’s network was getting congested and gas prices were jumping up and down:

“Myself, and many other high profile Ethereum application developers made a prediction that EOS would, in all likelihood, attempt to attack the Ethereum network gas prices to validate the launch of their platform.”

And further, after it had allegedly happened, in response to how one can be sure it was indeed EOS:

“EOS has been attacking the network on and off every time something they do doesn’t run properly… It started one month running up to the mainnet release. It was predictable and very clearly orchestrated… Follow the wallets. If you don’t think EOS is doing it, then who has 2 million dollars a day to attack Ethereum, and also owns EOS tokens?”

Daniel Larimer’s cold and succinct response can be seen below:

Larimer Message

The Most Recent Scandal

Earlier this week, Ethereum went a step further and plainly accused EOS of not being a Blockchain company altogether, a claim of immodest proportions. A research study conducted by the Ethereum-funded company ConsenSys and its partner Whiteblock concluded that EOS had been built using a model which is profoundly different from the universal standards of today’s Blockchain technology. Whiteblock’s CTO (Chief Technology Officer), Zak Cole, who is also one of the published report’s authors, proclaimed:

“EOS token and RAM market is essentially a cloud service where the network provides promises for computational resources in a black box for users to access via credits. There is no mechanism for accountability due to the lack of transparency on what block producers are able to create in terms of computational power.”

This has resulted in a heated discussion on Reddit with many users taking a stand in support of either of the two companies.

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Epilogue

The rivalry now seems like the result of bad blood right from the very beginning. Predicting what is going to happen next is difficult, but most likely things are only going to get more wound up. The market is ultra competitive and billions of dollars are up for grabs. On the plus side, perhaps a by-product of this rather nasty exchange will bring the users better and cheaper technology; after all, as the late Henry Ford once said, “competition is the keen cutting edge of business, always shaving away at costs”.

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Company Profile: Maker. An Express Visit

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No opinions and rants, only straight facts about Maker, quick and easy to understand
Company Profile: Maker. An Express Visit

Company name: Maker

Cryptocurrency [utility / governance token]: Makercoin / MKR (volatile)

Cryptocurrency [stablecoin]: Dai (pegged against the USD)

image

image

Price per unit of MKR (at the time of writing): ~660 USD, 2nd in the world after Bitcoin

Market capitalization of MKR (at the time of writing): ~480 million USD, 22nd in the world

Year founded: 2015

Founded by: Rune Christensen

“MakerDAO works using collateralized debt positions (CDP) on a decentralized platform. People can take out debt positions using our stablecoin, the Dai (1 Dai = $1). The Dai credit system uses tokens or assets to back up their value… Leverage seekers or borrowers put collateral, like Ethereum, into the system and generate Dai based on that collateral… MakerDAO and the MKR token use a decentralized governance structure to bring stability to our stablecoin, the Dai. We believe money and credit systems should be transparent, so no one can sneak in their own agenda.”

Support platform (Blockchain): Decentralized Autonomous Organization (DAO) on the Ethereum network

Structure: Collateralized Debt Position (CDP) + Target Rate Feedback Mechanism (TRFM)

Standard protocol: ERC-20

Top wallets: Ledger Nano S (hardware), Trezor (hardware), MetaMask (web), MyEtherWallet (desktop)

Recommended exchange platforms: Bitfinex, Bibox, Gate, Okex, Paradex

Mining: Not permitted

This week’s stats:

image

From all of us here at U.Today: happy trading and have a pleasant weekend!

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The Egg of Andy Weir

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Blockchain and sharing economy went public in 2009 and are a total success
The Egg of Andy Weir

If the name of Andy Weir does not sound outright familiar, then the movie The Martian will. Andy Weir is the novelist who wrote the book in 2011 that was made into the eponymous movie in 2015.

Weir’s most famous short story, however, that went through another round of popularity with the movie release and that he published on his website back in 2009 is “The Egg”. Tallying at around 1,000 words, the story has been translated into over 30 languages by readers and is still bringing today around 100,000 visits to Weir’s website monthly.

The gist of the story is this. A man dies in a car crash and emerges in a place of nothingness where he meets God. God tells the man he will be reincarnated as a Chinese peasant girl in 540 AD. Not only that, but that the man is constantly going through reincarnations through time and that every person the man ever knew directly, including his wife and kids, by proxy, or indirectly like Hitler and Jesus — they have always been reincarnations of this very man. Every person that ever existed in the universe is this man.

If you haven’t read the story, read it, it’s likely to be worth your time.

The quote of particular interest is where God explains to the man why the universe exists the way it does:

I looked you in the eye. “The meaning of life, the reason I made this whole universe, is for you to mature.”

“You mean mankind? You want us to mature?”

“No, just you. I made this whole universe for you. With each new life you grow and mature and become a larger and greater intellect.”

“Just me? What about everyone else?”

“There is no one else,” I said. “In this universe, there’s just you and me.”

You stared blankly at me. “But all the people on earth…”

“All you. Different incarnations of you.”

“Wait. I’m everyone!?”

“Now you’re getting it,” I said, with a congratulatory slap on the back.

“I’m every human being who ever lived?”

“Or who will ever live, yes.”

“I’m Abraham Lincoln?”

“And you’re John Wilkes Booth, too,” I added.

“I’m Hitler?” You said, appalled.

“And you’re the millions he killed.”

“I’m Jesus?”

“And you’re everyone who followed him.”

You fell silent.

“Every time you victimized someone,” I said, “you were victimizing yourself. Every act of kindness you’ve done, you’ve done to yourself. Every happy and sad moment ever experienced by any human was, or will be, experienced by you.”

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Sharing economy formation

Again, the “The Egg” is Weir’s most famous story and it was relatively popular before the book and the movie The Martian. Why though? I am going to try and give this a little perspective and whether it’s a stretch, of course, entirely up to you, but it might be worth a little ponder-over.

Andy Weir published the story on his website in 2009, and the date is almost at the crest of the wave of the sharing economy formation as a concept and roughly at the foot of the sharing economy implementation in various models.

The term ‘sharing economy’ started appearing in the early 2000s and some sources attribute the first use of the term in public to professor Lawrence Lessig.

Sharing economy was a novel idea and required a leap of trust that took a lot of people to make, and it took years for a lot of users and investors to grow on.

What’s interesting though is that the concept took a firm root around the same time when the global financial crisis peaked in 2008. When the trust went away from the vertical structures — institutions — and splashed into the state of distributed, social, and horizontal.

If we list a few examples of companies that immediately come to mind when we talk sharing economy, the dates of when they started are telling:

  • Kickstarter — founded in April 2009

  • Uber — founded in March 2009

  • Airbnb — founded in August 2008

  • Indiegogo — founded in 2007

  • BlaBlaCar — founded in September 2006

With the collapse of the vertical trust flow came the great new realization of distributed trust models in which people made the great leap and started trusting each other — allowing complete strangers into their apartments, sharing long-distance car rides with someone they never knew, and giving money to people through a website simply because they liked the idea of what was promised and didn’t need or want corporations to shove a new product down their throats.

Did people shortcut the empathy distance and realize they were all more or less similar and closer to each other with the rise of the sharing economy? They arguably did.

This was the time when Andy Weir published “The Egg”, the story that says:

“Every time you victimized someone, you were victimizing yourself. Every act of kindness you’ve done, you’ve done to yourself. Every happy and sad moment ever experienced by any human was, or will be, experienced by you.”

What’s extremely interesting is that the Bitcoin network went live in January 2009. It’s fascinating how much time the humankind and the ideas move in unison and do so without realizing it. The implementation of Blockchain, a trustless public ledger, that should be — or already is, depending on what project you follow — the backbone of the distributed, social, and horizontal trust happened at the same time that the implementation of the sharing economy started. Both the Blockchain technology and the sharing economy became a success.

When you check the timeline and put “The Egg”, the collapse of vertical trust, the sharing economy, and the Blockchain technology in the same row, you realize we are talking the same thing. U°Community believes the next wave of development and progress is in establishing transparent and immutable paths for the flow of the energy of trust for the communities — which are the now of the world progress — to truly thrive.

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