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Satoshi Mystery: Ripple CTO Makes Unexpected Remark

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Sat, 8/06/2024 - 12:42
Satoshi Mystery: Ripple CTO Makes Unexpected Remark
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In response to an X post, Ripple CTO David Schwartz offers his take on the recent legal developments involving Craig Wright, an Australian Computer Scientist who has claimed to be Satoshi Nakamoto, the pseudonymous creator of Bitcoin.

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In the latest twist in the Craig Wright v. COPA case, the Crypto Open Patent Alliance has demanded that Craig Wright pay 85% of its legal costs. COPA took Wright to court in February to determine whether he was Satoshi Nakamoto, the creator of Bitcoin. Judge James Mellor, the case's presiding judge, decided in March that Wright was not Satoshi and did not author the Bitcoin whitepaper.

In response to COPA's request, Wright's defense argued that not specifying the perimeters within which Wright can claim to be Satoshi could infringe on his human rights.

This argument posed by Wright's defense has sparked a fresh debate in the crypto community, with many labeling it as outright fraud. However, Schwartz presents a nuanced perspective on the matter.

According to Schwartz, the act of Wright claiming to be Satoshi in casual conversations, where there is no direct intention to gain monetarily, might not constitute fraud. This distinction draws a line between personal claims and those made with the intent to deceive for financial gain.

Schwartz suggests that a potential legal remedy could be an injunction that would prevent Wright from leveraging any claim to the Satoshi identity to obtain something of value. Such a measure would aim to protect the community and the market from any misleading assertions that could influence financial decisions.

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Judge Mellor concluded in his written judgment in late May that the subject of injunctive relief — a legal remedy to prevent a defendant from doing something — will be debated at a Form of Order hearing scheduled after the verdict is handed down.

In response to COPA's recent request, Wright's defense has requested that the amount he pays be reduced to 70% of the costs COPA incurred. As the legal drama unfolds, the cryptocurrency community awaits the next outcome.

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