🤷 Opinions Katya Michaels

Unicorn Ladies of Blockchain: From Marissa Mayer to Other Role Models

Opinions
The crypto industry is a fascinating, growing field with room for all the brilliant ideas that women may not have been able to realize elsewhere
Unicorn Ladies of Blockchain: From Marissa Mayer to Other Role Models

Often, when we speak about achievements of women in a traditionally male-dominated field, we tend to highlight the brightest stars and the record breakers— or, to use the industry parlance, the “unicorn” ladies of the tech world.

While this focus on the most successful female leaders is natural and inspiring, it can also be daunting for women who are just now considering investing in crypto or working in the Blockchain industry. Indeed, the narrative of a woman who “proves” herself worthy of being in crypto through exceptional performance runs counter to the principles of equality and inclusion embraced by the Blockchain community.

The high level of technical expertise and entrepreneurial professionalism among female leaders in the tech industry is undeniable, but the term “women in crypto” should, and does, have a far wider base.

Being Marissa Mayer

Recently, Marissa Mayer, one of the earliest Google employees and the former CEO of Yahoo, has re-entered the tech media spotlight as the founder of her own tech business incubator Lumi Labs. Some publications are hailing her new venture as a “comeback,” but perhaps this framing is guided by the search for a catchy headline rather than a true commentary on her career path.

Clearly, Ms. Mayer dedicated most of her life to gathering extensive experience in the tech industry. While the media wasn’t focused on her work, she didn’t cease to be a woman in tech, and will remain a female leader in the tech industry even if she never holds a C-suite position again.

Uneven, limited recognition of female achievement and the perpetuation of the tech industry’s “bro culture” image in the media can obscure the way opportunities are changing for women in Blockchain. While the percentage of women in prominent leadership roles is steadily increasing, there are many other ways for women to join the community.

Will the women in crypto please stand up

It may seem that the crypto industry, emerging at the intersection of security tech and finance, is filled to capacity with two types of players– developers and venture capitalists. In truth, the crypto community is far more eclectic, and women in crypto are not always the usual suspects.

Leah Callon-Butler discovered Blockchain through her work in renewable energy and became a co-founder of a Blockchain-based platform for payments in the adult industry– which may seem an unlikely turn of events, but makes perfect sense on closer inspection. Recognizing a community in need and an opportunity, Leah applied her previous experience and talents in the crypto space:

“I've always worked in emerging technologies, across lots of industries but focused on sales and business development. As I was doing my MBA, I found that I had a real passion for the social impact. When I discovered Blockchain technology, it blew my mind. I couldn’t imagine a world where we weren’t controlled totally by centralization.”

No one working in Blockchain today was trained for it specifically or born into it– it’s a new technology that gathers forward-thinking professionals from all fields. Entrepreneurs, developers, investors small and large, financial analysts, bankers. marketing and PR managers, PhD candidates, regulation lawyers, crypto tax advisers, event organizers, enthusiasts, evangelists, real estate and travel agents, movie people, musicians, adult industry workers and the writers who tell their stories— all of these are women in crypto.

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A role model near you

A brief overview of recent crypto and Blockchain conferences shows that in the past few years, the participation of women speakers grew from less than 10 percent (or, in one infamous example, three out of 88) to more than 30 percent. Educational crypto events and meetups for women are becoming more widespread, and Blockchain-based products are developed specifically with the female consumer in mind.

For instance– Adryenn Ashley is one of the most influential women entrepreneurs in the crypto community today, and she is focusing her efforts on an augmented reality dating app that uses Blockchain to provide women (and men) with a safe, secure and natural-feeling dating experience.

By creating a simple app that will be effortless and fun to use, Adryenn hopes to bring Blockchain, as well as the freedoms and responsibilities it entails, further into public awareness. She is also one of the many women leaders in Blockchain who promote initiatives that create more opportunities for women from all skill levels and walks of life to enter the crypto space as an investor or startup founder.

The great equalizer

Whether or not Blockchain can be a solution for all issues of digital security and trust; whether or not it is the “truth machine” many hope it will be, Blockchain may succeed where education and equal-opportunity initiatives have failed to give women equal access.

The decentralized nature of crypto networks means that there is no central locus of power or control, which implies equality of opportunity and a very low barrier to entry. That is where the most fervent supporters of Blockchain technologies place their hopes– on its ability to include those who are disenfranchised socially, economically and geographically.

Crystal Rose, the co-founder and CEO of an AI communications platform, began to code at the age of 11 after discovering a learning opportunity in AOL chat rooms.

Since those early days of the internet, access to online education has improved, and Blockchain can open even more doors to those who are cut off from traditional banking, education and political stability.

Toni Lane Casserly, known in the community as “The Joan of Arc of Blockchain,” has advised startups and organizations like Singularity University and the United Nations for almost 10 years.

She is especially interested in the way Blockchain can redefine governance to ensure human dignity and freedom.

Tony Lane believes that with peer to peer governance, “we are fundamentally incentivizing people to have economic liberation through real open markets that are based on stewardship, generation and interdependence…. It is a huge way for women to gain economic opportunity. We are changing the dynamics for investing in women and fundraising for women.”

Adryenn Ashley agrees– without Blockchain technology, women entrepreneurs would have to bid for traditional venture capital investment. “Women should be getting more investment, but they're not– just because of the way the system is designed. Unless you’re a 25-year-old Stanford grad, Asian male, you can't write something on a napkin and get a $5 mln seed round. Blockchain gives women the opportunity to do it and democratizes the entire investment field with ICOs, token sales.”

The crypto industry is a fascinating, growing field with room for all the brilliant ideas that women may not have been able to realize elsewhere. Having been a developer, an entrepreneur and an angel investor herself, Crystal Rose has one advice for women entering the industry: take more chances. “You've got to say, ‘Hey, I want to bet on this thing and I want to go for it.’ I think it would be great to see women stepping up with ideas earlier because you can validate them faster, you can get through that cycle faster and get to the next stage. We want to see women accelerated.”

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Eyal Hertzog’s Cryptosophy: Why Online Economies Will Win

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Decentralized ecosystems aren’t zero-sum, they’re “infinity sum.” Nonprofit economies empower for-profit businesses, driving growth.
Eyal Hertzog’s Cryptosophy: Why Online Economies Will Win

I’ve been an entrepreneur since the dot-com days, and I always thought there was only a single path to realizing a technological vision: founding and scaling a for-profit company. But there is a better model for building technologies based on decentralized systems and community-owned networks.

This new model is not an alternative to for-profit companies. Rather, it is a collaborative framework for creating an online economy made up of many for-profit participants who collectively provide an integrated set of solutions, sharing the same database, user base and currency.

Developing a standard

The path to becoming an online economy inevitably involves defining a standard for value exchange.

“Currency moves energy in various forms (such as products, services and knowledge) between the people and organizations that participate in it. This happens much like blood moves oxygen between organs in the body.”

The first wave of online economies to utilize a non-national currency was centralized in nature- game currencies, loyalty points, and virtual world currencies operated by private businesses and in some cases traded in online exchanges. The first online economy not controlled by a central authority was Bitcoin, a simple, single, decentralized and permissionless digital currency.

Non-profits  

The second major online economy to emerge was Ethereum, which added a programmable layer for “automated trustees” (aka smart contracts), providing solutions for commercial collaboration between parties that may not fully trust (or even know) each other.

Ethereum’s economy, which uses the ETH currency, is structured as a non-profit (as I believe economies should be structured). However, an economy without active for-profit participants can be compared to a company with no employees.

ConsenSys and Jaxx are two for-profit companies founded by team members who were part of the effort behind Ethereum and are now playing an important role driving its economic growth. They are motivated and mobilized by the ability to make a profit in this economy. Their profit is also indicative of the economy growing, benefiting participants, including those who bet on this economy by holding its currency.

The Ethereum case-study has clearly demonstrated that substantial profits, for the team, contributors and early adopters, are very much possible. This can be done without needing to generate profit from the economic entity itself (in this case, the Ethereum Foundation). This allows the project to focus on what economies should focus on: growth.

Driving growth

Individual companies are comparatively slower to scale, while online economies scale horizontally, through the work of many different entrepreneurs simultaneously. Since online economies use their own unique currencies, economic growth means that participating businesses will see the value of their tokens grow, enabling them to scale their operations as well. This is the essence of a distributed model and the main driver of its network effect.

As an example is the Bancor Network, an online economy providing technological solutions for liquidity. The token of this economy (BNT) is staked by participants, providing them with access to the liquidity network, which enables decentralized conversion of any integrated token.

Bancor is also managed by a non-profit foundation whose mandate is to grow the economy. This may even take the shape of empowering companies that were once considered competitors, to build services and solutions alongside the original creators. This accelerates adoption in this “infinity sum” game where all participants win as the online economy grows.

Bitcoin, Ethereum and other crypto networks have demonstrated the power of secure and decentralized currencies to yield vibrant online economies focused on cooperation over competition.

Big businesses can be painful. We all know it. They tend to become “evil.” It’s in their DNA because by nature they are incentivized to work primarily for their own profits, rather than for the growth of their ecosystems.

“It now seems that a model in which smaller businesses collaborate to provide solutions within a framework of online economies could deliver superior results across almost every vertical and be a lot more fun to build in the process.”

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Linda Zeilina of Re-Define on Who is Blockchain’s Worst Enemy

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In an exclusive interview, UK-based think tank Re-Define’s Linda Zeilina talks about the prevalence of groupthink, the lack of diversity and limitations of Blockchain
Linda Zeilina of Re-Define on Who is Blockchain’s Worst Enemy

As governments and financial institutions grapple with the task of regulating digital currencies, they seem to be embracing Blockchain, the underlying digital ledger technology which powers the world’s most profitable cryptocurrency Bitcoin.

UK-based think tank Re-Define’s Linda Zeilina special advisor on sustainability strategies talks about the prevalence of groupthink, the lack of diversity and limitations of Blockchain in an interview with Cyril Gilson, Editor-in-Chief of CryptoComes.

Cyril Gilson: Could you tell me about your think tank and your audience?

Linda Zeilina: I work with Re-Define, an international think tank that helps corporations and governments implement sustainability strategies to become more environmentally friendly. I work with asset managers and government officials to integrate Environmental, Social and Governance (ESG) factors into their institutions.

Re-Define operates as an academic and consulting body.  We have visiting fellows and a large team of people who work internationally. Our visiting fellow’s program brings together tech pioneers from France, Silicon Valley and other parts of our world to serve as a brain trust. We challenge people to think outside of the box and invite a diversity of opinion.

In the tech industry, there is a strong tendency to have “groupthink.” Tech entrepreneurs passionately believe in their product this mindset sometimes results in overlooking issues and blind spots.

CG: So would you agree that the biggest enemy of the crypto community is the community itself?

LZ: We are all our own worst enemies to an extent. But I think diversity can bring new perspectives to the industry. Corporations are increasing diversity because they have woken up to the fact that women, minorities, people from different regions have a different way of looking at things. Alternative perspectives can be useful to identify opportunities and risks that one may have missed because of a sharp focus in one’s particular area.

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What is essential

CG: How do we change the dialogue? We hear many negative things about cryptocurrencies and comments that Bitcoin is a bubble. It makes people in the industry very defensive.

LZ: Educating the public is essential. The crypto community has been using a top-heavy approach which may not work as well as bottom-up approaches. When you get people involved, you put pressure on governments. It’s been pressure from bottom up that has influenced governments to address climate change. People suffering from direct implications of climate change are going out there, talking about it and bringing attention to the issue. Similarly, you have to think about digital currency as an advocacy and information campaign.

The issues that fire up

CG: But addressing climate change is a matter of life and death while adopting digital currencies is a question of paying a seven or three percent fee. Do you think it’s an issue that will fire people up?

LZ: People can be mobilized;  it’s how you communicate to the public. If you explain to them that healthcare will be cheaper, taxes won’t be as complicated, and they can be more secure from identity theft; then you can fire people up.  People like convenience, the rise of Amazon has been about making things quick and easy. Who doesn’t like quick and easy?

CG: Debates in cryptocurrency community get quite heated. Do you think the community could improve the way in which they communicate?

LZ: Definitely.  Communication is everything.  In a way, this is how technological advancement has always worked. Something gets invented, and then others improve it, and everyone has an opinion. I think that the community needs to solve its own issues because they are the best equipped to address them.  People remain protective because everyone wants to maintain their competitive edge.

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Role of governance

CG: What about the role of governance in Blockchain technology?

LZ: Everybody hopes that governance will change the status quo, but there are inherent limitations. We have examples of failed projects due to lack of underlying infrastructure, like Honduras.  Without decent governance, accurate record keeping, Blockchain may not work.  In some cases, governments can corrupt the system. The whole 51 percent aspect of the nodes is something no one seems to be talking about, and we have heard very little about the weaknesses of Blockchain.

Weaknesses of Blockchain

CG: So what are the weaknesses of Blockchain?

LZ: Well there are several. It is the 51 percent that can change the Blockchain outcome. If you do have a government that creates a land registry, but it’s an unequal society where not everybody will have the computing power or the ability to participate, Blockchain may not work. Moreover, stakeholders can use the technology to protect their interests.

Another major challenge is the amount of energy consumed by Blockchain. If Bitcoin used nearly 160 countries worth of power last year, that is hardly sustainable under the Paris Agreement, and people are not going to be happy.

CG: That’s their algorithm, and it cannot be changed.

LZ: Exactly! We need to invest more in green energy. The majority of Blockchain businesses will probably fail. But I have a firm belief these limitations can be solved through technological advancements in all areas.

Women’s role

CG: Do you think women are under-represented in this community?

LZ: Absolutely.  I also find it kind of funny because women are associated with the softer issues. Every time you go into a crypto conference people always start talking about the technical aspects.  Everybody knows how the technical aspects work; it’s far more interesting to see how the technology will interact with society and what the potential backlash might be.

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CG: Have gender differences played a role in the advancement of agendas because men are about achievement, advancing their agenda and women care more about society?

LZ: I don’t think that’s the division. The community needs an excellent communicator who can translate the message well to the public. Both men and women can be excellent communicators; it is a matter of who has the charisma to get them thinking.

Learn from the East

CG: Do you expect a greater advancement in the use of Blockchain technologies in developed countries or emerging economies?

LZ:  While much of the brain trust exists in the US and Switzerland, it’s important for institutional investors to know that there are real opportunities in the East.  Cities like Vizag, India, can leapfrog more easily because they don’t have massive institutional entrenchment which makes them more open to technology and the benefits it can bring.


Blockchain if appropriately used can reduce the know your customer issue of investing in startups in the East. A lot of sustainable energy startups are emerging in the East that solve everyday problems using a bottom-up approach. There is a lot to learn from that area and I hope Western startups and tech communities wouldn’t be too arrogant to learn from the East.

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EOS’s Ricky Shi: Could Governments Hold EOS by the Balls? I Don’t Think So

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Could governments hold EOS by the balls? EOS block producer shares his view on the future of the platform
EOS’s Ricky Shi: Could Governments Hold EOS by the Balls? I Don’t Think So

EOS, fondly referred to as Ethereum on Steroids, is tipped to emerge as one of the leading cryptocurrencies in the nearest future.

Ricky Shi, co-founder of EOS Cannon, gave us an exclusive interview touching the base on EOS approach to governance, the role of Block.one, building EOS community and ecosystem,  and the perspectives of  EOS.  

A string of positive news is making EOS and EOS-related tokens a good investment. Founded in 2016 by Brendan Blumer and Daniel Larimer, EOS worked with Michael Novogratz and a known VC investor Christian Angermayer.

Recently Peter Thiel, a business partner of Angermayer and Bitmain’s founder Jihan Wu participated in the new fundraising round of the EOS backbone Block.one.

So far, EOS has been the basis mostly for development tools and some simple games. Nevertheless, the potential of this system is widely regarded as pretty high. For example, KickCoin (KICK), an ERC20 token for a crowdfunding platform, went up the charts when rumors hit the crypto market that the company negotiates with EOS Block Producers its possible migration from Ethereum to EOS.

EOS approach to governance

CryptoComes: Critics often say that EOS is not, in fact, a decentralized network, but subject to control by something akin to a government. They specifically mention the recent decision by the EOS centralized body to ban transactions from the specific 27 wallet addresses. What would you respond to the critics?

Ricky Shi: Well, there is not anything akin to a government, otherwise it won’t take some long and so many community calls to make a collective decision to freeze these accounts.

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CryptoComes: How will you describe the EOS approach to governance, on a scale between a totalitarian state and the complete anarchy?

RS: I would say 6, but right now 4. A few important governance pieces are not yet fully functional.

CryptoComes: Do you have a closed telegram group for 21 block producers or some similar venue for communication and making decisions?

RS: There is a mainnet BP telegram with 415 members if that is what you mean. There are weekly calls among top BPs to discuss and make decisions only related to BP part of duties.

Role of Block.one

CryptoComes: What is the role of Block.one now? What happens if some producers will join forces to challenge the principles ingrained by Block.one into the system?

RS: Block.one is one of the important contributing community members. Anyone can propose different ideas, but you need to get your voice heard, discussed and agreed upon (by vote, not by Block Producers) before there will be a change in the system.

CryptoComes: How big is the community you are working with? How will you describe it?

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RS: 2,000+, a very active elite group with a deep appreciation of EOS principles and are all believers in EOS vision.

CryptoComes: What are your major principles in working with your community?

RS: The principles are simple: community first, tier by proof of stake, free will & free to join, communication & daily coaching.

Preventing losses

CryptoComes: According to recent research, theft in the crypto industry is booming, with the volumes stolen this year times exceeding similar numbers in 2017. Can EOS tactics of fighting them be described by the words “scar them out”?

RS: Not exactly sure about the term. EOS has some design to prevent such loss. As for the EOS Cannon community, we coach our members to use the safest approach and developed our own version of offline wallet tools.

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CryptoComes: Could the principle of the delegated proof of stake and on the whole the EOS consensus mechanism change with time?

RS: IMO, there will be adjustment at implementation level, but not in the principle.

CryptoComes: Are you a pragmatic or a moralist yourself as it comes to the community principles? Moralist means the man or principles, such as decentralization, and pragmatic is a person who may be more flexible if circumstances require immediate action and the principles stand in the way.

RS: I think I am a bit of both. Maybe more towards moralist a bit when a critical situation doesn’t demand an immediate pragmatic approach to resolve.

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Still great experiment

CryptoComes: Nick Szabo insists that the centralized aspect of EOS leaves the project vulnerable to attacks and security holes. Some say that by having or introducing centralized bodies, crypto platforms are bound to become more vulnerable to hostile regulation. What would you say to that?

RS: Then what would he say about the current government system we all live in? As for the more vulnerable part, I think we will see how it goes.

It is a great experiment in mankind history after all.

CryptoComes: Related question: governments now can hold big exchanges by the balls. Could big exchanges, in their turn, could have EOS by the balls? Meaning that governments will eventually control EOS?

RS: Big exchanges are centralized. EOS has dPos and quite dispersed geographically. I don’t think so.

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EOS voting

CryptoComes: What, if anything, needs to be changed in the EOS voting system?

RS: You probably need to be specific on voting for what. Quite a few parallel efforts are carried out related to voting. If you are talking about BP voting, it is currently working, except we need more voters participation. If you are talking about how many votes per EOS, that is still an open discussion as of now.

Dethroning Ethereum

CryptoComes: When do you think EOS will dethrone Ethereum, or it’s not on the current agenda?

RS: I don’t have a comparison or agenda there. Let us stay focus and make EOS better.

CryptoComes: With the lack of regulation, are the smart contract-based platforms simply preposterous for now?

RS: I don’t think so. It is in its infancy and needs time to evolve and mature.

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AI and the future

CryptoComes: What is the place for AI and machine learning in future decentralized networks?

RS: IMO, it will be a natural marriage. But hold onto that idea before we have the supercomputer running at its full speed.

CryptoComes: What do you think of the future of EOS?

RS: Bright, promising and it is just the dawn!

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Crypto Wallet Users are on the Rise: Numbers Approaching 30 Million Globally

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The number of crypto wallet users has increased almost tenfold since 2015
Crypto Wallet Users are on the Rise: Numbers Approaching 30 Million Globally

 

Nowadays, crypto wallets are an integral part of crypto ownership and trading: naturally, one must have a secure place to keep one’s valuable digital belongings.

Whereas not long ago, wallets were somewhat of a rare occurrence, they have since grown in numbers. Substantially.

The graph below shows the situation, past and present, between 2015 and today:

Graph. Number of Crypto Wallet Users Worldwide

After a timid start with ~3 to ~4.5 million users in 2015, the first quarter of 2016 started to approach 7 million users globally, followed by ~11 million users in the last quarter of that year.  

Last year’s first quarter saw a promising start with almost 13 million crypto wallet users, followed by almost twice as much, ~21.5 million, 9 months later, as the year came to a close.

2018 began with the first quarter’s figure reaching for ~24 million, gradually climbing further up to almost 30 million crypto wallet users the world over that we have today.

We hope you found this information useful. Be sure to also check out:

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Where Is It All Happening? The Biggest Crypto Cities of the World

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We’ve done our research, and we bring you our succinct conclusion: the most influential crypto cities of our planet
Where Is It All Happening? The Biggest Crypto Cities of the World

Today, we bring you our version of the biggest crypto cities in the world. Two factors were taken into account when compiling this list : 1) the number of crypto companies in each city, as well as their influence on the global market, and 2) how widely crypto payments are accepted in the region. So, here they are listed alphabetically:

Crypto city

Amsterdam (the Netherlands)

With numerous Bitcoin ATMs and many merchants that accept Bitcoin as a legitimate form of payment, the capital of the Netherlands has by now also become one of the crypto hotspots of Europe. The Dutch city is home to at least 90 such businesses, as it is to the Bitcoin Embassy, one of Bitcoin’s major global promo establishments anywhere in the world. So, if you happen to be in town, there is now more than Van Gogh and Rembrandt to see and buy, RLD excluded.

Buenos Aires (Argentina)

With most South American economies in a state of financial uncertainty and terrible inflation, many are looking for alternative ways to store their wealth, or whatever is left of it. Here, the capital of Argentina is leading the way: the city is home to almost 150 businesses that accept Bitcoin as a form of payment. For this same reason, Argentina has also become a major player on LocalBitcoins, causing a boom on the platform. The first ever Bitcoin conference in Latin America was also held in Buenos Aires last year.

Hong Kong (China)

Hong Kong, while technically belonging to China, retains its vital political and financial independence from the mainland. While the crypto ban has made things very difficult in Shanghai and Beijing, Hong Kong is taking full advantage of its economic freedom by bringing crypto prosperity to business in all possible (and profitable) forms. Among the numerous successful crypto companies that Hong Kong can boast about are two major global players: Bitfinex and HitBTC, founded in 2012 and 2013 respectively.

Ljubljana (Slovenia)

Many might not have even heard of Slovenia, let alone its capital Ljubljana; after all, it’s a small nation with a small capital. However, this city is a serious force to be reckoned with when it comes to the world of cryptography, Blockchain, and DLT: Ljubljana is home to the world’s first ever Bitcoin mall known as Bitcoin City, i.e. a shopping center where all vendors accept Bitcoin. The mall is an impressive 475 000 square meters in size, concurrently making it Slovenia’s largest shopping center of any kind. Major crypto firms, among them NiceHash and Bitstamp, are also based in the city.

New York (USA)

It is a well-known fact that New York is considered to be the world’s financial capital. When it comes to centralized finance, i.e. Wall Street and banking, there is hardly any rival that can challenge NYC’s dominance. When it comes to the world of decentralized finance, though, the city’s claim to power is yet to be made, after it manages to catch up with San Francisco’s arguably stronger output. Be that as it may, NYC is already home to more than 100 businesses that accept crypto payments, as it is to a number of major crypto companies, among them ConsenSys.

Prague (Czech Republic)

The capital of the Czech Republic may not have that much to offer, comparatively speaking, in the way of giant crypto companies which are on par with some of the other brands mentioned in this list. At least not yet. But what Prague is still lacking in quality, it is certainly making up in quantity, a pattern which is bound to eventually pay off. The city is growing in crypto adoption at a stunning rate, and for this reason it is currently ranked first by Forbes by number of businesses accepting crypto payments, more than 150, which is more than anywhere else in the world as of this year.

San Francisco (USA)

San Francisco may quite possibly be the most influential crypto city in the whole world. It has already established its reputation as a major tech hub, thanks to its proximity to Silicon Valley (around 40 miles). Now the city is also swiftly turning crypto on a huge scale: it is already home to many giants of the crypto game, among them such well-known brands as Ripple, Kraken, Coinbase, and Blockchain Capital. Furthermore, San Francisco is home to around 120 merchants that accept cryptocurrency and almost as many crypto ATMs. With such impressive stats, not many places can compete with this global crypto hotspot located in Northern California.

Singapore (Singapore)

Singapore is a unique city-state. Known for its international trade and entrepreneurial vibe, it got involved in the crypto world early on and is now considered to be one of the most crypto friendly places on our planet. It is, of course, no coincidence that one of the current crypto trade leaders of the world, the exchange platform Huobi, proudly calls Singapore its home. Among many other crypto companies based here are Litecoin, Signum, NEO, and Virtuse.

Toronto (Canada)

The largest city in Canada is also one of the biggest crypto cities in the world, which, according to some sources, contains over 200 crypto ATMs within its borders, more than any other city in the world. This is in part because Canada’s progressive government is for the most part supportive of DLT, and hence most laws on ICOs and crypto startups are quite relaxed. This is also why Toronto is said to have as many businesses within its greater suburban area that accept digital currency as the Dutch capital, Amsterdam.

Zug (Switzerland)

There is a very good reason why Zug is on our list, and it can be summed up in two words: Crypto Valley. The town located in central Switzerland is tiny. What is huge, however, is the amount of talent it contains and the number of crypto companies it hosts: over 300 of them from 20 different countries, including Buterin’s Ethereum. With the Swiss government being supportive of the Blockchain technology, the town is also home to the annual Crypto Valley Blockchain Summit, which is regularly visited by members of the European Parliament.

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